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Site Not Available on GoDaddy Hosting

GoDaddy Hosted Website – Unable to connect

unable to connect to godaddy hosted website iconCan’t establish a connection to the server at www.***online.com.

  • The site could be temporarily unavailable or too busy. Try again in a few moments.
  • If you are unable to load any pages, check your computer’s network connection.
  • If your computer or network is protected by a firewall or proxy, make sure that Firefox is permitted to access the Web.

Slow TTFB, Timeouts, No Connection, Database Errors on GoDaddy Hosting

google bot page load speed chartTime to first byte served (TTFB) often 15 seconds and longer, another 15 t0 60 seconds before the full page is loaded, Google bot page load over 4 seconds, “unable to connect to WordPress database”, unable to connect to website. Some of the ‘normal’ performance issues experienced by a client’s site hosted with GoDaddy.

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Does GoDaddy Restore Website Database

 GoDaddy Restores Website Database Without Asking?

godaddy restores database icon

I wonder how many others have noticed something odd happening with their WordPress sites hosted on GoDaddy. By odd, I mean you make changes e.g. delete fix or captured 404 errors, activate a new plugin or update a plugin and so on, then the next day you go back to the site, and all the changes are gone – the same things fixed yesterday still exist?

There are only two things I can think of to cause this to happen;

  • Sites using distributed servers are not updating (unlikely with basic shared hosting)
  • the hosting company (GoDaddy) is restoring the site and/or database from a backup (most likely)

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GoDaddy Server Attacked

DoDaddy Server Network Crashed by DDos Attack

gonedaddy - godaddy logoGoDaddy Hosting’s entire server network was taken down Monday Sept 10, 2012 by a Distributed Denial of Service (DDos) attack by a hacker. Most, if not all, websites hosted by GoDaddy were down for several hours. E-mail and telephone services were also affected

Exactly how many sites were affected. GoDaddy is one of the world’s largest hosting providers and domain registrar with more than 5 million websites affected by the outage, and peak downtime estimates suggest as many as 48 million websites were affected by the attack

Mail Online (dailymail.co.uk) reports:

  • Web hosting giant hacked and all of the websites run through GoDaddy were shut down temporarily as a result of Monday’s attack
  • Service was eventually restored for the bulk of customers by 5:43pm (GMT)

GoDaddy spokeswoman Elizabeth Driscoll said:

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Cache Pre-load Impact on Performance

Cache Pre-load Improves Google Page Load

Using a cache pre-load system can improve Google crawl page load speed substantially as clearly shown in the infographic below. Google considers page load in it’s SERP algorithm as an indicator of site quality: Where two similar ranked sites exist, the site with faster load speed will usually get better SERP than a slower site. With this in mind surely it’s a good idea to make the effort to improve page load speed as much as possible.

Page load speed can be improved in a number of ways;  moving the site to a better hosting service, optimising the site technically, including getting rid of unnecessary plugins, keeping image size as small as possible, and using an effective caching system are some of the things we can do.

No matter how well all the other technical aspects are improved, caching the site, and especially pre-loading the cache, will make a big difference to page load speed.

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13 Second Page Load Acceptable

New WordPress Site Loads in 13 Seconds

GoDaddy LogoI read a forum article the other day where a web site developer mentioned 13 seconds to load the front page for a new WordPress (self hosted) site was ‘acceptable’. The developer compared this to another build taking 18 seconds to load that he considered unacceptable.

Anyone who has installed a new, clean WordPress website will know the brand new front page has very little content to slow down a page load – all the time is used by the server reading from the database. I must question the knowledge of any website developer who finds thirteen seconds to load this clean install front page acceptable. Five seconds are pushing things already, less than two is acceptable!

If the server takes so long to read a database consisting of no more than a fresh WordPress installation, a single short page and a welcome post message, how long is it going to take to serve pages to visitors once there are 50 posts, 100 posts, 1000 posts?

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