Category Archives: Windows

8ta 3G Modem Issue Resolved

Recurring problem with 8ta 3G Modem

I have previously enthused over the 3G service package from 8ta Telkom South Africa, but mentioned one problem with the modem or software in my 1st month use review.

“the application has a tendency to ‘freeze’. It shows it is connected, but other apps, e.g. browsers and mail clients cannot connect to the net. A manual disconnection just leaves the modem reporting it is disconnecting, and cannot be closed without using Task Manager to force a close”

At the time of posting the article I mentioned I suspected it was something to do with my system, not the modem or the software.

“This may be a purely local issue with the PC in use”

Finally got round to sort out a few things for myself that have been left for ages.

Huawei Modem Instability  fixed

Huawei E1820 3G Modem
Huawei E1820 3G Modem

The Huawei E1820 Modem software app was uninstalled, and the modem moved to a rear panel USB port, instead of the front panel port it had been plugged into initially…

Additionally, the no longer used modem drivers and software (for the previous Voda service modem) were removed from the system.

End result – modem has been completely stable now for 8 days – more than 100 hours of connection time.

Possibly the older Voda software drivers were causing the problem, more likely the Huawei E1820 prefers the USB2 port it now inhabits (the front panel ports are USB1). Better still, it is now connected to a USB cable, whereas when using the front port, it would only work plugged directly in to the socket – suspect a power availability issue there

A local system problem only

The conclusion must be drawn that the 8ta 3G modem problem was purely a local machine problem and not anything wrong with the hardware or software. The service remains in my view the best value mobile connectivity option available in South Africa at present.

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Trojan Generic24 Family

Article about Trojan Horse Generic24.cgol

The previous article posted on this blog about Generic 24 Trojans elicited a lot of interest. Even more interest was shown in my removal tips for the generic24.cgol variant, posted on my website.

I thought now would be a good time to post an update. The .cgol variety seems to have died down somewhat, however it seems everyday that a new version is detected. Recent references I found include;

  • trojan generic 24 cjgk (also generic24.cjgk (20 Sept 2011)
  • trojan Generic24.BRQA 
  • trojan Generic24.BRQD
  • trojan Generic24.BRQF etc (Full list at AVG)
  • Trojan Horse generic24.TSU (21 Sept 2011)
  • trojan Generic24.BUOM
  • Generic24.BVUA (22 Sept 2011)
  • trojan generic24 pnt (12 Sept 2011)
  • GENERIC 24.CPQJ (23 Sept 2011)
  • trojan-generic24-aawj (12 Sept 2011)
  • Trojan horse Generic24.CAVY (21 Sept 2011)
  • GENERIC 24.CPQJ (23 Sept 2011)
  • Generic24.BIVS (2 Sep 2011)
  • Generic24.FLZ (05 Oct 2011)
  • Trojan horse Generic24.PYB (01 Oct 2011)
  • Generic24.ATJW (03 Sept 2011)
  • Trojan horse Generic 24.WMQ (24 Sept 2011)

The list goes on; these are from recent forums and other articles found via a search engine, from Sept this year.

There are literally thousands of similar malware trojans with the name ‘generic’

One common factor is they are generally considered hacking malware, opening a backdoor to other viruses which capture personal information from the user of an infected PC.

Again I stress the importance of early intervention should one of these trojans infect your PC.

The removal tips at the above web address can be used to fix most early infections by looking for similar HKEY references to those mentioned for FireFox

Laptop Windows Recovery

No Windows Disk With Laptops

I recently came across a post regarding a problem experienced in trying to recover a broken Windows Vista Operating System on a Laptop.

windows 7 logo

Windows 7

The laptop was supplied without a windows installation disk; which is an increasingly common scenario. Laptop manufacturers (OEM – Original Equipment Manufacturers) seem to feel that the built-in recovery function is sufficient, and saves them a few cents of the cost of supplying a disk.

Sadly, the recovery system does not always work… damaged hard drives, viruses, and numerous other lesser factors can prevent this from working as expected.

The unhappy laptop owner put the blame on Microsoft; “since Microsoft stopped supplying installation disks with laptops” I contend this is not Microsoft’s fault, it is the OEM laptop manufacturers fault.  Microsoft does not manufacture laptops. In fact Microsoft made Vista readily available, and 7 can be installed from any disk using the matching version and the PC owners ‘key’.

Microsoft does not sell Windows CD’s, they sell the licence, i.e. the right to use the operating system. Anyone can download the operating system from their website for free, and even run it on trial for a limited period of time. When you decide to keep the version you are happy with, purchase the licence, enter the activation code, and you have a full and legal Windows installation.

I agree that not having the disk on hand is annoying. Perhaps it is time Microsoft demanded OEM’s provided an installation disk included with the package. Consumer demand is of course the real answer. Refuse to buy any equipment that does not come with a legal version of the operating system, whetehr it is new or used.

It is not exactly a new phenomenon, Going as far back as Windows XP and perhaps even earlier, OEM’s were providing their own disks, which often had a customised Windows installation, rather than the standard version which Microsoft provides on their own disks. Very often these OEM’s (and I mention Dell, and Hewlett Packard) had hard coded the BIOS, which was then locked, making it extremely difficult for owners, even technicians, to install any other version of operating system. They of course will contend this is to “improve the user experience of their products” and other such nonsense! This practice was not only limited to laptops, but the desktops from some manufacturers also had this limitation built-in.

I believe they do this in order to lock their customers into their own support network! While it is reasonable to expect the owner of ANY equipment to be required to make use of a manufacturers support service during the WARRANTY period, making it extremely difficult for the owner to choose another service agent outside of warranty is a violation of consumer rights, definitely in my own country, and I am certain this applies in the USA and much of the EU as well. Consumers have a right to choose!

All is not lost however

As mentioned, the operating system can be obtained from Microsft or other sources. Just download it (using another PC if the one with the problem has totally ceased to work, burn it to a disk a writeable DVD will be required) and run this on the PC (or laptop) required. You may need to choose which version to use.

On your laptop or desktop, there will be a ‘certificate of authenticity’ which describes the version the licence is for, and the ‘key’ to enter when requested. That’s it, the installer will continue and the system will soon be back up and running.

Real life examples: Read the rest of this entry