Ads Free or Self Hosted


WordPress.com Ads Free Upgrade or Self Hosted WordPress

You don’t like the ads placed by WordPress.com on your blog. Should you take the Ads Free upgrade option, or instead choose to self host your WordPress blog?

ads free or self hosting thumbnail imageWhich is the better option to choose? The decision is subjective depending largely on what you want to achieve from your blog. Self hosting a WordPress blog provides a lot of options not available to WordPress.com users e.g. a wider choice of themes, whatever plugins and customisations you want, your own Google ads campaign.

But maybe you don’t need any of these options, you only want to have a blog free from advertising. Then the decision comes down to a few things only…

Cost Shouldn’t Be the only Deciding Factor

There’s hardly any difference between the cost of a self hosted WordPress blog and the ads free upgrade option from WordPress.com. The Ads Free upgrade costs $30.00 per year, while you can get el-cheapo basic hosting for about the same price.

It’s interesting WordPress.com has set the price for Ads Free at $30.00. Considering how close this price is to the possible cost of self-hosting, one may think it’s better to go with the self-hosted option. But there are still a few things to consider.

Possible Disadvantages of Self Hosting to Avoid Ads

Some things about self hosting should be considered before deciding to move your blog from WordPress.com

  • Site Performance
  • Security
  • Maintenance
  • Domain Strength

Low-cost Hosting for WordPress

One thing to think about before deciding on a self-hosted WordPress blog with very cheap hosting is performance. Entry level cheap hosting is always on shared hosting. All too often your blog will end up on an over-crowded server. Some of the big names have as many as 7000 sites on a server, sometimes even more!

We’ve seen WordPress sites on some big name hosts with page loads of 5 seconds and longer, and are often highly variable in performance from day to day

WordPress.com blogs typically perform well. The WordPress.com servers are well set-up and provide consistent performance. If you keep an eye on page load speed you’ll see there’s very little difference form day to day. They are also very reliable and secure. Downtime on WordPress.com is very, very low – it hardly ever happens!

That’s not to say you can’t find very good shared hosting, even shared hosting that will knock the socks off WordPress.com performance (we’ve got a few of these sites – running 4 times faster than WP.com average speed). But this is a step up in the hosting grade – costing around $10.00 a month…

Security of Self Hosted Blogs

Think about the security of your blog. There’s a saying in the industry that if you have a website of self-hosted blog, one day it will get hacked. If or when this happens, you will either have to fix it yourself, or hire someone to do it for you.

With your blog on cheap shared hosting, the possibility your site will get hacked rises with every other site running on the shared server. One hacked site can open the door for a hacker to break into other sites on that server, even to hack the server. The current number of hacked sites (WordPress and Joomla sites in particular) on shared hosting supports this statement. Some major hosting services including Bluehost, Hostgator and GoDaddy all have hacked sites on their servers right now!

With your blog hosted on WordPress.com, it’s looked after for you. If it gets hacked, WordPress.com will fix it for you. In fact, you’ll probably never know it happened. Even better – the WordPress.com servers are highly secure

Maintenance of Self Hosted Blogs

What about maintenance. It’s easy to update WordPress and plugins, but as we’ve seen over the years, often the update comes with problems. Problems as a result of a WordPress core update are even more likely to happen now that automatic core updates are part of the standard WordPress installation

When something goes wrong with your self hosted blog, you have to fix it yourself, or hire someone to fix it for you. I’m one of those crazy people who fixes broken or hacked WordPress installations. It can get expensive; from $50.00 for a simpler fault, to several hundred dollars or more depending on the complexity and time it takes to track down the problem, and find or write a fix.

Domain Strength

Although this is probably the least significant factor to consider, it’s worth noting that the WordPress.com domain carries a lot of weight in search engine rankings with a strength rating of 10 (the maximum). Some of this gets carried over to your blog, giving it a good start.

Your self hosted domain will have to build ranking from scratch – although if you transfer a blog and pay WordPress.com to redirect to your new domain, you won’t lose the rest of the organic ranking for your articles.

Your Own Advertising

If you want to run your own advertising campaign you have a compelling reason to go for the self hosted option. WordPress.com users can’t embed their own Google Ads on their blog pages.

If you want to use your site for other advertising, maybe paid for ads for companies active in your market sector, then you again have to choose a self hosted site; using a WordPress.com blog for advertising is a violation of the terms and conditions of use of the free blogging service

The Choice is Yours

At the end of the day the choice is yours whether to pay for the WordPress.com ads free upgrade or pay for a self hosted WordPress blog.

me on google plus+Mike Otgaar

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About Mike

Web Developer and Techno-geek Saltwater fishing nut Blogger

Posted on December 26, 2013, in Blogs and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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